Should You Use Video On Your Website?

Time for another Avidmode Chat. One of the burning topics in web design of the last decade has been the use of video as a marketing tool. What are the benefits for a business, how can you use video content if you’re not totally comfortable being the focus point and is it neccessary for your business.

The following blog post is an edited transcription of the video for ease of reading. You’ll find links to the people mentioned in the chat in the text. Enjoy!


Do I Need Video On My Website?

Gem:
Today we’re discussing videos on websites. Let’s start with one of the questions that we get most often, which is do I need to have videos on my website? Now this is a bit of a contentious subject, I would say. But what are your first thoughts when someone was say that to you? If say we had a client that would come in and say that.

Kittie:
I think that nine times out of 10, you probably do want to video, but it may not be the video that you think you need to put that or where you think you need to pursue.

Gem:
In terms of the video, If we’re talking about home page, let’s say a homepage video, what are those things that you want to put there on? and what are those sort of things that you really want to avoid…

Kittie:
Is a tricky one. Isn’t it? I think your website is there to attract clients, but it’s also there to deter the types of clients that you don’t want to work with. Especially if it’s a service-based business. If you’re selling products, then not quite as much, but generally speaking, that’s what you’re trying to do. So I think it’s an intro video, it’s a get to know the organization, get to know what the vibe is and resonate with the right audience. And it’s NOT a hard sell.

I think a lot of mistakes that I see in those videos are people selling, selling, selling, and also raising the objections that they think clients have. And that that’s not a bad thing to do, but also it’s not a good thing to do because what if those people weren’t thinking that in the first place? I think those, those are the challenges with the homepage video.

Gem:
Yeah. If you’re thinking about that hard sell, that’s one of the things that you would automatically think about doing, if it’s your homepage and you’d go into it thinking, okay, well, you know, this is my goal. This is the goal for my website, but you don’t want to be, to be too keen. Putting it straight on the front of your website, isn’t always the best way.

Kittie:
Yeah, it depends on the market is right. It’s a cultural thing as well, because if you’re building a site for a US client, which we’ve done many, many times actually hard sell is quite often the thing on a homepage but maybe further down – they can work. It depends what culture I would say, in the UK though a hard sell is not what you’re looking to do on the homepage.

Gem:
Yeah and that’s different from product based websites and service-based websites. You’re going to have something very different. In terms of that big, hard sell, would you say that would be more common on one over the other or not really?

Kittie:
I don’t think it is. I think you’ve just got to be more, you got to be useful, whatever the video is that you’re doing, it’s got to be useful. It’s got to be appropriate to your audience. So with the product one, it’s lovely to show maybe what the product looks like for a little bit of action for a bit of movement on the page, even in the hero image, having that as a moving video or a gift can be lovely. Whereas with service based people, it’s just getting to know the organization, getting to know the culture a little bit and you might think, shouldn’t that be on the about page, but the person may never make it to the about page, capture them quick, short and sweet.

I do like Sophie’s, from Rimu Marketing, she has one of her in action, teaching on her services page. And that’s really nice because you are actually seeing the person and how they’re going to be with you. I think videos are important in that way, because quite often we have really shiny polished websites. And then when somebody speaks to you, I’m not saying that people aren’t shiny and polished, but you have a very, very different personality.

I mean, people like Sarah Lynn Hodder of Bettering Youth, if you go to her website, that exudes her personality absolutely perfectly, but you don’t get that with a lot of websites. So the video can help you add that. So it’s not jarring when somebody contacts them.


Where Should I Put Video On My Website?

Gem:
Yeah, I think we’ll come back to that a little bit, cause it’s a really good point about authenticity and coming through on your website as a person rather than a business. One of the things I wanted to chat on and maybe ask Robyn was, in terms of your thinking, where does a video goes on the website, when you’re laying it out or wireframing. In this case, thinking about the home page again, if someone wanted one where, where is the best place for it?

Robyn:
It really depends on what the content is based upon. Because if it’s talking about the organization itself, it’s probably gonna sit further down on the page just because you want to have the sections taking them across to the services, but you also don’t want it to be so low down that people don’t scroll to it, don’t see it and miss it. So we have to do some really careful kind of budgeting as we spoke in the previous episode. When it comes to the video, it’s all about the content that’s in it, and then we work out where it ought to sit on the page.

Gem:
Yeah, so it could be like Kittie was saying, it could be one of those that you put in the header/hero slot, That’s showing off a product or talking, it’d be very short and it’s right at the front and the center. Sometimes it could, like you’re saying Robyn, be further down the page, but integrated into one of the, as we call them blocks, that’s about you. That’s interesting. It depends what your goal is from the video as well, because you need to go going into creating the video knowing that. So if your goal is to capture people to learn more about you, that might be something that’s further down. If you want to show something off or sort of give people that big splash, it may be something that we put higher up, but it totally depends. Right? It depends on your industry as well.

Kittie:
Yeah. I think it also depends on industry as well because a video at the top of a website for a coach is perfect, because it says, this is me. If you want me to coach you, that’s immediately what you learn, you see it and you learn it immediately. You know, from the first 10, 15 seconds, that’s the person that wants to work with most of the time. Whereas for other services where it might not be, you might not be seeing the person very often, or you might be doing something in the background where you might have to converse with them, but it’s not going to be the same type of kind of interpersonal relationship. That’s where things changed. So you, you do also have to think about where it fits industry wise, as well as logically on a homepage.

Gem:
That’s a great point you’re talking about there. What you’re talking about with the coaching is trust and building trust – having a video, really quickly builds that trust with people in a way that, written content or even images just don’t don’t do quite as well. They just don’t pack that punch that a video does. If you’re a coach, it’s something that’s not all that common still. Doing videos is growing and it has been, but it’s not something that absolutely everyone has on their website.


Confidence And Comfort With Being On Video

Kittie:
It’s really bizarre because if you look at the US coaches that we’ve built websites for video is prominent. Yeah, absolutely. I’m going to say the UK based coach websites that we’ve built, not a single video, I’ve got placeholder images ready for videos to come. The whole period of 15 years that we’ve been building websites, I don’t think a single coach that we’ve worked with, you know, even where we’ve suggested it have put a video up there and maybe it’s just comfort level thing.

Robyn:
I was going to say it’s quite a, it’s quite a heavy thing. Cause it’s, I think it’s also kind of confidence and fear that they’re coaches, but putting yourself in front of a video camera and talking with no one to bounce off can be quite scary. And I think they forget that they actually don’t have to do it that way. They think, I’ve got to film this video for my website, I’ve got to sit here, perfectly made in front of my camera with no distractions where actually they don’t have to make it like that. They could do it on a walk or they could do something where they’re talking with other people and showing how their business works, they forget that that’s an option. And that fear stops them that, “Oh, I’ve got to do it this way. And that’s scary”.

Kittie:
It does. And I some great videos from, you know, people like Marissa Holden, who’s a local videographer. She does some amazing videos, even with people on zoom now where she, you know, she coaches them on how to present themselves and she coaches them on what they need to say. She’ll do the filming if it’s in person or she’ll do it over zoom. So the kind of conversation that we’re having now, I think if you’re starting to do a video series on something like YouTube, then a professional quality does not need to be there from the start. If you’re doing something for the homepage of your website, then I think you do need assistance in storyboarding in, in getting the content right.

In getting the calls to action right and potentially even getting the video set up, getting some help around coaching for you. So I would suggest a professional for that. I think it has to be the right professional too, because we’ve seen some idiots. It’s hard. If you go to someone who’s just going to shoot you against the wall. And you’re literally either reading the autocue or you’re reading from notes on your lap, it needs to be more conversational and have more flow than that. That’s where the interviewing technique is quite good. If you’ve got the person who’s actually interviewing you and chatting that way.

Gem:
I think that’s probably because when you build your website, there’s so much that goes into it in terms of making sure that every part of it is polished and that the customer journey is correct. And you know, that we’re we’re pointing to those moments that are wowing people. You don’t want that video to be the one thing where they go, well, this is a bit rough for, you know, this doesn’t look right. Or I wish I hadn’t clicked it’s too loud. Or do you know what I mean? You don’t want it to be terrible quality and not fit with the story that you’re telling.

So, I was going to discuss something else off of what you just said, and it’s gone from my brain, which is really handy. We were discussing trust and we were discussing authenticity. Yeah. So we were saying about how it takes a lot for you to be comfortable. And there’s a lot of people that actually are willing to help or not, not for free usually, but they are there and they know what they’re doing.

I guess, what are you looking for in someone who can do those, who can make those videos for you? If you’re say networking and you come across someone, how do you know whether they’re the right person to go with?


What To Look For In A Videographer?

Kittie:
Look at the type of video that they make. Look at their reels, look at where they’ve worked in the past. Are they, are they somebody who’s got that creative flare and have done the type of video that you’re looking for? Are they seasoned professionals or is it something that they’re just trying out? There’s no problem with that, we’re going with companies that are just trying out as long as you can see some work that they’ve done and you’re happy with, with the quality of their products but it’s somebody who can guide you in the storytelling piece as well. Absolutely be able to help you tell the story that you want to convey in that video. Because as you say, there should always be a goal for the video, like any piece of content, whether it’s a blog post, whether it’s a video, whether it’s podcast, whether it’s your website, you’re telling a story because you want somebody to take some form of action.

So you need, you need to be working with your web team. You need to be working with your marketing team. If you’ve got one or a marketing coach and a video person, and they all need to come together to make sure that you’re telling a cohesive story, across the board. And that sounds frightening to small businesses because that’s a hell of a lot of people doing a hell of a lot of stuff, but actually, you know, you can get three creatives in a room for 15 minutes and they’ve sorted it as a plan. They come up with a plan, they know where they’re going, but having that communication is absolutely vital.

Gem:
And that does tend to be one of the things that in terms of when we’re working with clients that we struggle with, because they will be all the components that are working together for the website, but the communication isn’t there, there isn’t the linkage. So if you do have the opportunity and you know, you’re working with someone who does your marketing, and you’re working with someone that’s doing your photography, make sure that those people are linked together and they have the ability to solve problems between them because, your marketing person will have an idea of what they’re trying to do. Your website designer is, or your agency has an idea and also the person who’s taking your photographs has an idea. So all of those lines do need to be joined for it to work on your website and work as part of your marketing and working as part of your video. So I think that’s a really good point. Just making sure that those lines of communication are connected to begin with.

Kittie:
Oh absolutely, and rely on those people’s, networking and backgrounds because you can bet the marketing person, the web person, and the photographer will have a really good idea of who might be great for video. If they’ve already had that conversation and even graphic designers, you’re having a branding done by a separate agency, they will also have a really good idea of who would it be able to help with video. And they’ve known them, they’ve worked with them in the past, you know, that you’re going to get a quality product.


Showing Your Personality Through Video

Robyn:
Another thing from that, so a photographer, for instance, because they working with you in such a, like a close aspect, they get to see facets of the client’s personalities. That maybe somebody who is working on a website doesn’t and that gives them a new insight. So they can actually come and say, Oh, actually this part of their personality, isn’t really shown on the website. Maybe this is, you know, like maybe the writing needs to change up. Maybe it’s somebody who’s doing your marketing actually needs to say, well, they say this line all the time. And it really fits that profile that needs to be in their marketing, or it needs to be on their, their social media posts, that type of thing. And it’s all those little insights from each. And every person that really helps make something completely yours.

Kittie
Yep, there’s nothing worse than getting a brand shoot halfway, a web design project. When you’ve already done the wire frames, you’ve already done the color versions, and then you get this amazing brand shoot, but it’s completely different, look tone and feel to what you’ve designed. So, I like to see, even if it’s the first versions of those images up front, if you can. And some of the best briefs that we get as well, from agencies have the client’s catchphrases in them, along with all of the demographics of who their audience are, but those personal touches, which is why I really like our actual client to sit down, the end user customer to sit down and complete those questionnaires and, you know, complete the brief, because it’s in their words. I don’t necessarily need to see marketing speak in a brief, I want to get to know the person.

Gem:
Because a marketing person or a web designer can make any website, without having that detail, but it doesn’t make it personalized to you in any way. As an example, we had a great, opportunity to see Jenny, I want to say her name is Tschiesche, but I’m going to get that wrong. We got the opportunity to see her. I think it was just before the lockdown, I think it was 2020. Yeah. I think it was in either the end of 2019 or something like that. But we popped along to do, a little bit of photography for her website. And we went to one of her sessions, working with some sports personailties with these youngsters. And honestly, just by being there in the room with her for that hour or so, the amount of help that gave to us to see her just doing what she does was amazing because we knew where she was coming from, what her service is and how she portrays that. And then that makes it so, so much easier to build a website that actually fits. And I think that, that isn’t an aspect, which you don’t get too often because I mean, it’s not easy.

Kittie:
Yeah, absolutely. Well, I think, the more information, the better. It’s more important, I think for a designer or a creative of any kind to go and see the client at their place of work than it is for the client to come and see the creative and their place of work. Yeah. Super important.

Robyn:
Yeah. It’s natural. It’s like they’re sitting in their natural space obviously because you’re meeting somebody possibly for the most, most first time it’s nerves, but you’re seeing them in their workspace, you get to see their desk, you get to see their space and you get to kind of really see them as a person.

Kittie:
Which does, you know, even if you’re just talking bare basics, you’re getting that information just subtly from everything you see. And if you bring them into your space, they’re seeing all about you, but you’re not learning as much about them in that process.

Gem:
And that does link into that authenticity thinking, because when you’re filming something for yourself and you go, “okay, well I need to make this video for my website”. It becomes quite easy to be rigid and not be able to show off because you don’t not don’t necessarily have the knowledge of filming. You don’t know how to and there’s a bit of a barrier to entry. I mean, the amount of times I’ve tried to do a video and I’m smacking the script up underneath the camera and just kind of go, “how do I do this?” – I’m sure that’s the same for everyone. I know I say authenticity all the time. But to get that across on camera is something that you do sort of need someone else to break through your uncomfortable-ness and missing knowledge and just help you with, to break down those sort of rigid moment.

Kittie:
It is absolutely. It’s like, it’s like having, if you catch somebody in their natural environment, you get their emotion and how they are as a person, rather than that very false, you know? No smile in the eyes, deer in the headlight look, which is why I think you need someone to help you break the ice. I mean, some people don’t like to be videoed. We’ve been doing it for so many years that it really doesn’t bother me anymore. But, I think because we’ve all been on Zoom last year or Teams, I think actually most people are quite comfortable now. So it should be fairly easy to go and have some studio time go to a venue being recorded.

One of the things we didn’t talk about, are the types of video, things like drone work. You can have some amazing footage that you just talk over the video. It doesn’t have to have you in it. It can have your signature in it. IE you’ve been involved in telling the story, creating the story board, creating the script. You could have somebody to do the voiceover if you’re really not happy with it.

Most videographers have people who will do the voiceovers, we work with lots of agencies and they’ve got many, many contacts for voiceover artists, which are not as expensive as you think they would be. But that’s what I’m saying. Drone work can be fantastic depending on what your business is. A little voiceover, some captions, it doesn’t have to be talking. It might be anything, but it just needs to be educational.

Gem:
And we’ve worked with quite a few people that do drone work and I’ve met him for networking as well (referring to the amazing John Brady, you can see some examples of his work on LinkedIn!). It works for so many different sectors. I’ve seen it work in real estate and I’ve seen it work in tourism. I’ve seen it work in, uh, what was the one we saw the other day, like reopening of high street – council work maybe?

Kittie:
It was beautiful drone work of the high street and then looped into the shop owners actually opening the doors and then walking through with video from the other side. Yeah, that was lovely. And I would normally think that that was quite kitsch. Actually. It was a really, really lovely video.

Gem:
Very well done. And it gives great insight into places that you work and live. If you’re located in an area that is beautiful, why don’t you use what you’ve got around you? And just have that as, as part of the building blocks o personality, right? Or of your business personality, cause you are a part of those communities. So it’s not necessarily a bad idea to have that integrated in some kind of way.

Kittie:
I mean, when we were, when we were still in London, being born and bred in London, you know, I mean, moving out to Berkshire six years ago, our tagline was “made in London” and everything that we did around our business was out and about in London. You know, one of our most popular blog posts is about the fonts and typeography for the signs and tube signs in London. It’s about making that connection for people. If you’re trying to connect to local businesses, if they are your audience, then resonating in that way, with things that they’ll recognize, is super important. And that comes through to photography as well as video.

Gem:
Yeah, it does. And the way that you use those things on social media and you’re using it on your website and everything, it should be sort of integrated to everything you’re doing. I mean, we live close to Chester which is a fantastic location, it’s very community focused and all of the businesses seem to have some sort of intermingling relationship and showing that off. It it’s a level of authenticity in itself. Right. I say that word again. I’m going to need to find a different word. I need some Gem-isms to throw in there for that one.

Kittie:
But what do you think about length of video?

Robyn:
I was about to say that actually the length of video. I guess I think it depends on type of business. You don’t want to lose people too quickly if it’s long and meandering.

Gem:
You don’t want it to be a one, two, three hour situation…

Kittie:
No, we had a two hour extravaganza that was provided to us for a home page of a website once. And that’s great because you’ve got two hours of video, which you can splice up for social media, but it’s absolutely not appropriate to put on that home page of your website.

Gem:
I think it depends on where you’re putting it on the website as well, some of the detailed information that you might want on something like a service page might make the video longer than say the meet the team or about page. I actually saw a really lovely meet the team one not too long ago. It was following people through their day and then like cutting it all together. It gave me a really good idea of who, who it was. That’s the kind of agency it was.

Kittie:
I get that a lot with creative agencies. They show the workplace, they show people in motion. Gary Wheal of Goosebumps Photography, who is a photographer and videographer who we worked with a few years ago, he did a lot of, time-lapse videos for products. Mainly in grass, if one of his clients sold grass seeds or something like that. Having that time lapse video actually on the homepage, watching the grass grow was quite radical. And I think he did another one where he went to, a manufacturer of some kind and he got some amazing footage of the machines at work. Again, I think you can bring that feel of your business into it by video, but not necessarily people in a video.

Gem:
And it’s not expressly saying what you do but giving it a feel. I think it’s about the atmosphere. It’s not the easiest thing to understand either or verbalize, but it is about getting a feel into your website because a lot of the time when we’re building websites, it can be, you know, we’ve got a plan, we know what we’re doing, but there isn’t, personality to it or a feel to it. Adding that video in that motion really does pull that aspect in.

Robyn:
Yeah and I think you’ve hit on a perfect thing there, which is motion – is super important again, depending on business and industry for that, your favorite word authenticity… for showing who you are, for showing your clients, your potential clients, and even people who just want to work with you together collaboratively. Motion is so important to make the website feel alive because that draws you in, that little bit of sound, that little bit of movement. It’s the one thing that changes you from looking at some static to something that’s alive and exists in the real world.

Kittie:
It can be super evocative as well can’t it, Robyn. I mean, if you think about for a coach, something really forward thinking, whereas if you’ve got, a jewelers, who’ve been on the high street for a hundred, hundred and 50 years, something traditional but minimalistic and modern to show that they are in tradition, but they have moved with the times there’s all this all sorts of psychological boxes that can be ticked by having the right video.

Gem:
Would you say there are any business that you wouldn’t suggest a video for, in terms of anywhere on their website? Is there any that you would go, do you know what it’s not really worth?

Kittie:
Yes. Well, and it’s not just a type. When we talk about length of video and we talk about use of images. When we talk about use of video, I’m very much in the mind that it has to be right for the business. We’ve been in the situation where we created a website for a business where the client desperately wanted images all over the website and potentially video as well. And it didn’t need it. It needed no images. It just needed the very clean colors, the beautiful branding, the words, and a call to action on each of the pages. That’s literally all they needed and they’re fully booked. They used to be about 65 to 70% booked. They now have a waiting list and that website converts like the clappers. So it doesn’t have to have video. It doesn’t have to have imagery. It’s about the right place at the right time.

Gem:
Yeah. So not really in terms of there being specific sectors, but individually as a business, is it something that you need or is it something that is just sort of superfluous?

Kittie:
I think it’s a conversations that you need to have with the person who is building the user experience for you. So you need to sit down with your web designer and you need to talk through what you’re trying to get people to do, and they will be able to guide you as to whether it’s correct. We need a little bit of this type of video or we need a little bit of that type of video, or we can use some stock video shorts, which we can tailor and put as a, a header image. You know, that it’s having that conversation when you’re starting to look at the website and go, what’s the look and feel that I’m trying to creaet, what am I trying to get people to do? How do I want this to represent me? That’s why I say, you know, a hundred percent of the time we don’t need the video.


Other Options For Video On Your Website

Robyn:
You hit on something really important there, we’ve been talking about video with a video camera or drone work – but don’t underestimate the ability of animation. Which again does not have you in it. But if that fits your brand’s personality, if your brand fits with that animated style, then run with it because it will work if that matches your brand. We tend to think about front facing cameras and video clips of motion when talking about video but actually animation is also completely valid as an option because it’s just that movement that gets people clicked that will help them listen.

Kittie:
Any of those can date you as well. Can’t they, because I’ve that amazing one where the guy draws on the wall and he draws the story on a big whiteboard. I don’t know if you’ve seen it lots and lots of companies have got them at the moment. We’ve had them for the last six months or so, and he’s literally drawing out your business or your process or whatever it is that you do. And I love them. I think they’re great. But I think there’s a real danger with those because so many people use them that people are blind to them and it’s nothing engaging or unique enough about your business. So I think there’s a place for those. And I like them. They’re great for social media, small snippets. But they can become quite samey. And I think that’s one of the dangers of using video.

It has to be different, not different. That’s the wrong word.

It has to be uniquely about you.

Gem:
Yeah, So reminiscent of this topic actually, I was building up some Spotify playlists the other day and I came across the Harlem Shake and you know, there’s videos where everyone just sort of drops. And I just thought, actually that brings me back exactly to the period of time that that was a thing, but that’s just, it’s old now. It’s not new. And at that happens with everything that we watch.

(A strange Jim appears) – Um, two seconds I’m filming a video, goodbye 🙂

It happens with everything we watch, right? So everything that’s sort of, you put out there and I think animation is one of those things, which if you, if you create it in the right way, it should be, it should stand the test of time, but you don’t want it to be one of those sort of viral videos that is popular for that six month period of time in a year. And then three years later. Because it’s going to be on your website for awhile, unless you’ve constantly got someone filming something new,

Kittie:
The website is going to last a good three to five years. Obviously you refresh your content more often than that, but it needs to fit the customer journey. It needs to fit the design. So if you are changing things up on the website, constantly iterations, which you should be doing. Yeah. It needs to be, it’s an investment, just like your website is it’s an investment and you need to make sure that what you’re producing is something that you want to continue producing. And I would say for startups, that is sometimes when I think maybe they have video on the pages to start.

Gem:
Well, because you pivot so much, don’t you as a startup, you change the services that you’re doing. You go in a different direction. You’re feeling your way through growing this business and you change really, really rapidly. So I think the first iteration of a website for a startup probably doesn’t need investment in video. Or, if you do know that it’s going to be something that you may want to think very carefully about what you put in it. And just be aware that it is something that you will eventually want to change. And we’ve been through so many different iterations of who we want to work with, who we are as a business or our images and all that kind of stuff. It happens to every single small business.



Wrap Up

Kittie:
The only thing I would say, the worst thing that I see with videos, is no call to action. Yes. That’s my ending note. Whether it’s a soft call to action, because you’re not selling through the video, you’re educating, you’re resonating with people. You’re building that trust. Yeah. But you still need to say something to them at the end, that’s going to get them to take action.

Gem:
And when you say call to action, it’s signposting to another place on your website. You don’t want to send them anywhere else. You’re sending them to go and see my service page on hair dyes or on photography or whatever it is that you really, where you really want them to find/buy. Especially if it’s that hero section of your page. Be very clear on where you want them to go next.

Kittie:
Don’t don’t just leave them hanging, go check out the rest of my website. It needs to be specific. Yeah. So if we cannot say that it’s very much the wrong place to get them to sign up to newsletter general, get them to go to your social media channels. It needs to be something to explore deeper, further into what it is that you do grant.

Robyn:
Well, I think that brought us into a full circle back to our original joke, because that is what happens on YouTube, a call to action. It may be a meme nowadays -and it may be funny to kind of besay “like & subscribe”. But it works because whenever somebody says, press that lightbulb button, I immediately go and look, if they say subscribe and I haven’t subscribed to them, it reminds me.

Kittie:
Totally appropriate call to action to end the video with.

Gem:
We’re not talking about YouTube videos today, or any other type of marketing videos, we’re purely talking about the videos that had on your website that help you move that customer journey forward.

Kittie:
And that is an important distinction. That’s something we can discuss!

Gem:
Well, I think 40 odd minutes in, we shall wrap it up there ladies. Next week we have an extravaganza, because it’s time for Eurovision. So if you’re not prepared, get prepared, cause it’s going to be great. I’m really looking forward to it.

Uh, I don’t know about these two..

Kittie:
She’s pulling us along kicking and screaming.

Gem:
If you do want to talk any more about video or you want any recommendations for people that could help you out with your video, we have tons. So send us a message and we will send you in the right direction.

There’s some wonderful people, wonderful people that we’ve met at BNI and other groups that we can point you in the direction of who will be able to help.

End of the recording!

For anyone reading this far down the page, get in contact with us for any recommendations on videographers that might be helpful or simply if you feel like hashing out some ideas for video on your own website. You can always get in contact with us at hello@avidmode.com.




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